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20121127
20121127
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers had high hopes that cyber monday sales would add to what's been a strong start so far. >> if all goes as expected, today will end up being the busiest online david year, with major bargains and steep discountses just a click away. >> every year we see more and more consumers shopping is online, both the younger com
representatives tom price and keith ellison. >> brown: then, president obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possi
. the obama administration's economists estimate consumers would spend about $200 billion less next year than they would have otherwise. congress and the administration have only a few more weeks to nail down a deal. but that deal will have to address some tough issues, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away at one of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the government could save close to $150 billion by squeezing the prices the government pays for drugs. but many
's their money. we don't taken a editorial -- i don't dictate an editorial position -- i voted for obama. we have 12 newspapers that endorsed -- ten of them endorsed romney and i'm the c.e.o. but two papers endorsed obama which who i voted for and ten endorsed romney. >> rose: speaking of obama, the president, do you think he'll be different in the second term? >> somewhat. he won't -- >> rose: what makes you think that and how? >> i think second terms are different than the first terms. >> rose: first terms can be full of land mines, too. >> they can be. but in the first tomorrow some extent you and your party have to be thinking about your reelection. and a second term certainly frees up that aspect of it and then the question is how effective you can be in getting congress to work with you. >> rose: you have access to him. he calls you and -- >> i've never called him. (laughter) i've never called the president. >> rose: but you talk to him on the phone and go meet him. do you think he has a new attitude about business that's come about because of the first four years? >> i think that in the fi
of inequality that you have written about in your book? and will the election results give president obama a mandate to do just that? >> i think it should be part of the discussion. the argument sometimes from conservatives, and also from not just the 1%, but the 0.1%, is, does it make sense to focus on the rich if there is not that much revenue there? actually, i think so much money is concentrated at the top of the income distribution, there is money to be had. but equally important hit a sense of fairness. as warren buffett has pointed out, the fact that he pays taxes at an effective rate much lower to that -- much lower than that of lower-income americans, makes it hard to look at this as a shared sacrifice. >> and republicans argue that the wealthy are job creators and they may not be able to stimulate the economy as much as a mite -- as they might. >> absolutely, that is their argument and one buffett argued that this is a great opportunity -- and warren buffett argued that if there is a great opportunity, people will not turn it down because the tax rate is not lower. what we have s
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)